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    ?.??, 1 ratings
    40 listens

    Stand-Off

    By nukeintheradio


    Submitted by nukeintheradio, Aug 04 2013 10:47 PM | Last updated Aug 04 2013 10:47 PM


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    Good for a first, but hey, I tried.

    File: http://www.notessimo.net/uploads/b34fbf8459f3dcf1bdea90d0f12f0290.note
    Old File:


    4 Comments

    I was disappointed for a sec. because I thought Hellstick updated Standoff.

    Anyways, I'm guessing you're new & are looking for tips. 

    Don't make all the notes quarter notes when you place them like they're 8th notes, unless you're trying to get some type of effect, but it doesn't work here, or with this instrument. & don't put the first note in the gray space after the first black line, the black line is your first note placement.

    Wow! Thanks! Yeah I did just start. Thanks for the tips!

    I was disappointed for a sec. because I thought Hellstick updated Standoff.

     

    Anyways, I'm guessing you're new & are looking for tips. 

    Don't make all the notes quarter notes when you place them like their 8th notes, unless you're trying to get some type of effect, but it doesn't work here, or with this instrument. Also, you don't put the first note in the gray space after the first black line, the black line is your first note placement.

    Wow! Yeah I did just literally start :P  Thanks for the tip though, I'm not profound in making music. :D

    Here are some templates for forming music:

     

    1.) Start with a basic beat that you develop, changing only to match tense parts in the chorus, etc.

     

    2.) Develop around the beat and add to it, finding occasions to throw in solos or riffs.

     

    3.) Use a chorus to tie together transition pieces.

     

    4.) End the song in some way by slowing it down, reverting to an earlier beat, etc. or make it loop endlessly.

     

    Make sure to vary your instruments, patterns, and tempos.  Develop your projects with modularity using sheets.  Utilize harmonies (generally 3 and 6 lines apart) and nice chords (2 lines apart is a good starting one) to create pleasing sound effects.  Use complementary instruments from different tabs: guitar + drum set, winds + percussions, etc.

     

    Rock: Begin with drums.  Once you get good, you can begin with a riff.  Make sure to vary your dream beats often and keep everything fast paced.  Cymbals are required :).

     

    Jazz: Write your music in a fluid style, so that it doesn't follow an obvious pattern, but seems a little more sporadic.  This helps it ease into patterns and sound more natural.  It also works well with pianos.

     

    Piano: Mainly you will need to work with layering the highs and lows to try and capture moods.  If you can get used to creating patterns to portray moods, you will become very good with these scores.

     

    Orchestral: These compositions are difficult.  Start with something defining, like strings or wind, transitioning to more complex beats.  I suggest you go through the basics of what you want first in your head and possibly map it out per-instrument if you are having difficulty (instead of putting them all in all at once).

     

    Hope this helps ;)